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Proshares

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Posts: 19,115

#61 [url]

Feb 16 11 5:00 PM

651akathePaul wrote:
Proshares wrote:
You're just hoping that so the Twins don't run into them in the playoffs anytime soon.

smiley: laugh It is to be expected that the Yankees would eliminate Minnesota isn't it?

Well, I don't see either of them making the playoffs this year, so maybe next year.
  

World wouldn't make sense if they didn't smiley: laugh.
  

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Team Free Travis Snider.
  

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bkmac

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Posts: 714

#63 [url]

Feb 16 11 6:11 PM

kingkb34 wrote:
bkmac wrote:
30 Clubs in 30 Days on MLB Network, when does this start airing?
Feb. 28, 7:00 pm

Thanks for the heads up.

smiley: pimp that this thread has been stickied.

TeamYankees & NEW YORK JETS

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Proshares

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Posts: 19,115

#69 [url]

Feb 17 11 2:01 PM

A year ago, before the Philadelphia Phillies signed Ryan Howard to a five-year, $125 million extension, they had an internal conversation about pursuing the idea of a swap of Howard for Albert Pujols.

And the context is very important.

Albert Pujols
Tim Vizer/Icon SMIPursuing Albert Pujols doesn't seem like such a wild idea anymore.

Because it was a year ago that the Phillies were into their negotiations with the first baseman and knew how expensive it would be to retain Howard. And as they considered the best ways to get bang for their buck, they kicked around this scenario: What if the Cardinals have a tough time re-signing Pujols? What if it ever looks like Pujols might leave St. Louis? What if his salary demands are just too high for the Cardinals' comfort level?

The conversation was appropriate. The best front offices think outside of the box, and think boldly. It was prescient. Because a year later, the Cardinals are now faced with an extraordinary gap between what they are willing to pay Pujols and what he is looking for. I don't know exactly what the last St. Louis offer was, in total dollars. But given that the two sides basically agreed on the length of the deal but not on the annual salary, the guess here is that the Cardinals were willing to pay Pujols about $20 million a year over 10 years.

Which means that if Pujols is looking for Alex Rodriguez money, St. Louis is about $75 million to $100 million short of the asking price.

That has opened the door now for Pujols to go into free agency, and for other teams to start thinking about what signing Pujols would mean to their franchise.

The Washington Nationals angered other teams with their signing of Jayson Werth, but if they signed Pujols -- and had a team of Ryan Zimmerman, Stephen Strasburg, Bryce Harper, Drew Storen and Werth -- they would officially be at the table with the big boys, and would become part of the buzz on Capitol Hill. If the Chicago Cubs pried Pujols away from St. Louis, it would be payback -- a half-century later -- for the Lou Brock-for-Ernie Broglio trade. If the Texas Rangers signed Pujols, he could pursue just about every record in the book in their uniform, and have a Hank Aaron-like transition to DH in place near the end of his deal. A lot of Frank McCourt's transgressions would be forgotten if the Los Angeles Dodgers signed Pujols. If the Los Angeles Angels armed themselves with Pujols, Arte Moreno would get sore from all the back-slapping.

Pujols is perhaps the only baseball player who can single-handedly alter a team's brand; like Cal Ripken, he is known by casual fans who might normally watch just a handful of games, but would become regular followers if the slugger joined their local nine.

The big mistake the Cardinals made in all of this was not getting Pujols locked down to an extension before they signed Matt Holliday. That deal helped to back them into a corner. But now, after that gaffe, they rightly have concerns about how top-heavy their payroll would be if they give Pujols exactly what he wants, and they are staring at the very real possibility that Pujols is going to walk away for almost nothing, other than a couple of draft picks. He will veto any trade possibility, as he has informed the Cardinals.

The Phillies? Well, they made the safe (and expensive) play, signing Howard to his extension, after considering an intriguing chase of Pujols.

We posted a story on the Phillies' internal Howard/Pujols talk last March. And if you didn't think there was any logic to it then -- and judging from the comments section, it was a head-scratcher for a lot of folks -- maybe today you can see how Philadelphia executives were ahead of the curve in gaming out a possible trade that would've been among the most fascinating in baseball history.

Elsewhere


From Scott Beaman of ESPN Stats & Information, some perspective on Pujols' dominance:

"You probably already knew that Albert Pujols became the first player in MLB history with at least 400 home runs in his first 10 MLB seasons. But did you know that he also has 849 extra-base hits (99 more than second-place Ted Williams)? Or that he also has the most doubles with 426? Or that he and Ted Williams are the only players with a WAR above 80 in their first 10 seasons?

"Below is a list of several more of Pujols' accomplishments in his first 10 seasons with the Cardinals … and some perspective on how many other MLB players were his equivalent in their first 10 seasons in the big leagues."

• Bill DeWitt is taking a tremendous gamble, Bryan Burwell writes. Pujols has taken a significant step toward becoming a free agent. Derrick Goold put together this list of potential bidders. The Cardinals' executives still sounded confident, Dave Sheinin writes.

• Total speculation: The Nationals are very, very intriguing wild cards in all of this, because they have the money to be aggressive and because Pujols could do more for them than he could for any other franchise (except the Dodgers).

Boston Red Sox manager Terry Francona has a lot of good options with his lineup, about who to lead off, who to hit second and where to bat Jacoby Ellsbury. And he's got a lot of right-left balance on his roster, as well, the kind of thing that Phillies manager Charlie Manuel would probably like more of.

Francona could roll out very different lineups versus right-handed and left-handed starters, taking advantage of that balance. For example, versus right-handers, his lineup early in the year may well look something like this:

2B Dustin Pedroia (R)
LF Carl Crawford (L)
3B Kevin Youkilis (R)
1B Adrian Gonzalez (L)
DH David Ortiz (L)
RF J.D. Drew (L)
C Jarrod Saltalamacchia (S)
SS Marco Scutaro (R)
CF Jacoby Ellsbury (L)

Over the past three seasons, Ortiz's cumulative numbers against left-handed pitching look like this: a .218 batting average, a .674 OPS and 120 strikeouts and 13 homers in 454 at-bats. J.D. Drew's slide in performance versus lefties is not quite as acute: to .246, with a .358 on-base percentage. But he could also be a candidate for a platoon.

On the flip side, the Red Sox have right-handed veteran Mike Cameron on their bench, and it would be a natural choice to use him to spell the oft-injured Drew against right-handed pitchers. Jed Lowrie hammers left-handed pitching -- last year, he hit .338 with five homers in 71 at-bats against southpaws. And Jason Varitek found a second life as a part-time player last year, mostly playing against lefties.

So the Red Sox lineup versus lefties could look something like this:

SS Scutaro (whose numbers vs. lefties are a little better)
LF Crawford
2B Pedroia
1B Gonzalez
3B/DH Youkilis
3B/DH Lowrie
RF Cameron
C Varitek
CF Ellsbury

Or Scutaro could hit eighth, with Pedroia in the No. 1 spot and Youkilis in the No. 3 spot. By hitting Youkilis at No. 5 versus lefties, Francona could discourage opposing managers from using a lefty reliever in the late innings.

Look, no matter which way Francona goes, he really can't go wrong, given his roster depth. Ellsbury arrived in camp yesterday and indicated he is ready to go after an injury-plagued 2010, Dan Shaughnessy writes.

• Adrian Gonzalez, by the way, is anxious to start swinging a bat, and the Boston training staff is telling him they think his surgically repaired right shoulder has healed and that he's good to go to start swinging a bat.

"But I need that final checkmark to go ahead," he said Wednesday, standing outside the Boston clubhouse. That has to come from surgeon David Altcheck, who will be in Florida next week.

Gonzalez is scheduled to see Altcheck next Wednesday, on Feb. 23, and he has been trying to get his appointment time moved up from 2 p.m. to 10 a.m. that day -- just so he can join in the Boston hitting groups.

Jon Lester on the Red Sox outfield defense, which has a chance to be extraordinary: "Not a lot of balls will be finding grass."

Lester has walked into a new season, Steve Buckley writes.

• Stuart Sternberg thinks baseball can work in the Tampa area, but believes a ballpark would help. By the way: Folks around baseball assume that if the Wilpon family cannot hold on to the Mets, Sternberg would be given a shot to buy the team. It's all speculation at this point.

Moves, deals and decisions


1. The Toronto Blue Jays locked up Jose Bautista for five years, Ken Fidlin writes.

2. Joel Hanrahan will be the Pittsburgh Pirates' closer, Tim Povtak writes.

3. The Rangers are talking internally about the trade talks they have had regarding Michael Young, sources say. He is scheduled to report to camp on Saturday, Anthony Andro writes.

4. Joba Chamberlain says he's done talking about his weight, Erik Boland writes. I've seen this happen with players in this situation before: Teams will demote a young player who arrives out of shape quickly in spring training. And Chamberlain has options to be sent to the minors, at a time when the New York Yankees already are stacked with right-handed relievers -- they have Mariano Rivera, Rafael Soriano and David Robertson. Chamberlain isn't tipping scales in his favor.

5. Clayton Kershaw has been told he'll be the Opening Day starter.

6. Jeff Wilpon reiterated that his family won't give up the Mets. Potential investors are finding a clickable moment.

7. Delmon Young and the Minnesota Twins agreed to a deal.

8. Rickie Weeks agreed to a long-term deal.

9. Keith Moreland is going to step into the job that Ron Santo had.

10. Edwin Jackson wants to change jersey numbers, Mark Gonzales writes.

11. Freddie Freeman is out to win the Atlanta Braves' first-base job.

12. Russell Branyan signed with the Arizona Diamondbacks.

13. Ronald Belisario might not be able to pitch the entire season because of visa troubles.

Dings and dents


1. Scott Baker's elbow is flaring up, La Velle Neal writes. Joe Nathan had an outstanding bullpen session.

2. J.P. Howell is going to be treated with caution by the Rays, Marc Topkin writes.

3. Jason Kendall's shoulder has been cleared, Bob Dutton writes.

4. The Detroit Tigers are in good shape with their injuries.

5. Carlos Santana's recovery is the best story in the Cleveland Indians' camp.

6. Mark DeRosa is shooting for the Opening Day lineup, Henry Schulman writes.

Other stuff


• Dallas Green struggles to cope with his grief, Paul Hagen writes. Green is dealing with a hurt that won't leave, Tyler Kepner writes.

Barry Zito's father has a heart condition.

Tony Gwynn is recovering slowly from his bout with cancer, Tim Sullivan writes.

Kurt Suzuki is looking to revive his offense, Joe Stiglich writes.

Scott Kazmir is looking to bounce back from a disastrous year.

Dallas Braden sent his batterymate from the perfect game to Hawaii. Classy move.

• A couple of Seattle Mariners love their tattoos, Geoff Baker writes.

Vladimir Guerrero arrived at Baltimore Orioles camp.

J.J. Putz is eager to reward the Diamondbacks, Nick Piecoro writes.

Zack Greinke and Shaun Marcum know they have raised expectations.

• The Florida Marlins have high hopes for a reliever, Juan Rodriguez writes.

• The Cincinnati Reds' pitchers and catchers have reported, John Fay writes.

Todd Helton is competing with an edge this spring, Troy Renck writes.

• Expectations are high for Chris Sale.

• There are a lot of questions about the Rangers' rotation, Randy Galloway writes. Brandon Webb can step into this role.

Neil Walker may have found himself a home.

Francisco Rodriguez vows to win back the trust of the fans.

• The Houston Astros are taking the long road back, and it's the right path for them, Richard Justice writes.

• Jerome Solomon isn't going to complain about the Astros' ticket prices.

• Joe Maddon is optimistic about the Tampa Bay Rays, despite the mass exodus of veteran players.

• The Orioles' farm system is imbalanced, Jeff Zrebiec writes.

• Rick Telander has the inside story of Sammy Sosa's corked bat.

• John Jenkins went nuts in the second half and Vanderbilt pulled out a big road win. We're climbing.

And today will be better than yesterday.

 

 

LAKELAND, Fla. -- Detroit Tigers slugger Miguel Cabrera was arrested late Wednesday on suspicion of drunken driving in Florida, police said, the latest episode for the first baseman who has struggled with drinking-related problems.

Cabrera, 27, was spotted by a deputy in a car with a smoking engine alongside a road in Fort Pierce. Inside the vehicle, Cabrera smelled of alcohol, had slurred speech and took a swig from a bottle of scotch in front of a deputy, according to the St. Lucie County Sheriff's Office. He refused to cooperate and more deputies were called to the scene.

Miguel Cabrera
AP Photo/St. Lucie County Sheriff's OfficeMiguel Cabrera was arrested by the St. Lucie County Sheriff's Office and charged with driving under the influence and resisting arrest.

The arrest occurred about 110 miles southeast of Lakeland, where the Tigers hold spring training. Pitchers and catchers began workouts earlier this week, but position players like Cabrera don't start until Saturday.

"It's hard," said second baseman Carlos Guillen, who is in camp recovering from an injury. "He's a really good friend. I know he was working hard in the winter to have a good season this year."

According to the police report, Cabrera was wandering into the road with his hands up before he was handcuffed. The report quoted him as saying, "Do you know who I am? You don't know anything about my problems," and cursed at deputies who tried to get him into a patrol car.

One deputy struck Cabrera in the left thigh several times with his knee after Cabrera pushed into him, causing the ballplayer to fall into the patrol car. Cabrera refused to take a breath test, deputies said.

He was arrested on charges of driving under the influence of alcohol and resisting an officer without violence. He posted $1,350 bond and was released from jail at 7:45 a.m. Thursday.

The news was slow to reach the Tigers' spring training complex, but Guillen, who like Cabrera is from Venezuela, was shaken when he found out.

"Yeah, I'm worried about him," Guillen said, according to MLB.com, "because he's got a lot of talent. He's got the potential to be a Hall of Famer one day. Sometimes you have people around you that are not good for you. You think they're your friends, but they're not really friends."

Detroit general manager Dave Dombrowski wasn't immediately available for comment.

Cabrera is coming off perhaps his best season. He hit .328 with 38 home runs and 126 RBIs in 2010 and finished second to Josh Hamilton in the American League MVP vote.

Cabrera signed an eight-year, $152.3 million extension with the Tigers in 2008. He is under contract until the 2015 season.

In 2009, police said the All-Star first baseman got into a fight with his wife after a night of drinking, right before his team surrendered the American League Central Division title to the Twins.

Dombrowski had to pick up Cabrera at the station after that incident. No charges were filed.

During spring training last year, Cabrera said he was done drinking alcohol after he spent much of the offseason in counseling.

"You guys write in the paper 'alcoholic,' that's not right," he said last March before a spring training workout. "I don't know how to explain, but it's not an alcohol problem."

Cabrera has a home in Boca Raton, about 75 miles south of Fort Pierce. There was no phone listing for him.

 

 

With college baseball's Division I schedule starting up on Friday night, here's a preseason look at the top 50 prospects for this year's Rule 4 draft, a class that is as loaded as any I can remember. It shows great strength in college and high school pitching and has some depth in college outfielders, with athleticism on display all over the place.

It's also the last draft under the current CBA, and with MLB threatening to implement hard slotting, players are expected to sign more readily while teams focused on acquiring amateur talent are expected to blow out their draft budgets.

After the top 50, I've listed a few more names of players who could end up Day 1 picks, potentially high ones, depending on how their seasons go. I'll have more thoughts tomorrow in the MLB Draft Blog on the candidates to go No. 1 overall.


Big Board Bar

1
Anthony Rendon
3B
6-0
190

Analysis: The presumptive No. 1 overall pick, but by no means a lock. Rendon has an outstanding approach at the plate with great bat speed, and he's a plus defender at third. He's recovering from his second major ankle injury and will have to show he hasn't lost any agility.

2
George Springer
OF
6-3
220

Analysis: An athletic outfielder with an above-average arm who projects to hit and hit for power and just needs to refine his approach, especially with two strikes.

3
Gerrit Cole
RHP
6-4
220

Analysis: Huge arm strength combined with results and some small signs of increasing maturity since high school.

4
Bubba Starling
CF/P
6-5
195
Gardner H.S.

Analysis: The Golden Child with the name to match, Starling is committed to play baseball and football at Nebraska, but an entire industry is hoping he chooses baseball. He's got five tools at the plate and is very projectable on the mound, with a higher ceiling as a hitter.

5
Sonny Gray
RHP
5-11
180

Analysis: Some teams will shy away from right-handers under 6 feet, but Gray is a fierce competitor who will reach 96 with good run and a hard breaking ball that would miss bats in pro ball right away.

6
Matt Barnes
LHP
6-4
203

Analysis: Regularly 92-96 with a hard curveball and an average changeup and a delivery that's gotten a little cleaner since he entered UConn as an unheralded and undrafted freshman in 2008.

7
Matt Purke
LHP
6-4
180

Analysis: Big stuff from the left side with outstanding performance as a freshman last year, but the low arm slot and concerns about his workload have him below a few other college arms.

8
Francisco Lindor
SS
5-11
170
Monteverde Academy

Analysis: A true shortstop with feel to hit and surprising pop for his size as well as a ton of energy on the field that will help elevate him in June.

9
Archie Bradley
RHP
6-3
215
Broken Arrow H.S.

Analysis: Committed to Oklahoma to play quarterback, Bradley is a monster on the mound, up to 96 with a plus breaking ball and an ideal combination of size and athleticism for a workhorse starter.

10
Blake Swihart
C
6-1
175
Rio Rancho H.S.

Analysis: Switch-hitting catchers are rare beasts, and Swihart has made a lot of progress in just a year and a half at the position; he has arm strength but has to improve his footwork and receiving to justify my aggressive ranking here.

11
Taylor Jungmann
RHP
6-6
220

Analysis: Scouts dislike the way he finishes the delivery but are consistent in praise of his stuff and history of performance.

12
Jed Bradley
LHP
6-4
224

Analysis: Reportedly hitting 97 in preseason workouts, even at 90-94 with an above-average changeup he's one of the premium college pitchers in this draft.

13
Dylan Bundy
LHP
6-1
205
Owasso H.S.

Analysis: Brother of Orioles farmhand Bobby Bundy, Dylan will show four pitches and has been up to 95 in the past.

14
Dillon Howard
RHP
6-2
200
Searcy H.S.

Analysis: Big and physical, up to 95 with a hard curveball, and a strong commitment to the University of Arkansas.

15
Jackie Bradley Jr.
CF
5-10
175

Analysis: Probably the draft's best defensive center fielder, this Bradley is a four-tool player who needs to avoid getting power-happy at the plate and focus on using the whole field.

16
Nick Delmonico
C/3B
6-2
185
Farragut H.S.

Analysis: A baseball rat with good bloodlines and a big-time hit tool; he's most likely a third baseman in pro ball, but will play both spots this spring and could convince a team to leave him behind the dish.

17
Brian Goodwin
CF
6-1
170

Analysis: Has looked rusty so far this season but is one of the most exciting athletes in the draft, with plus-plus speed and a sound approach at the plate.

18
Andrew Susac
C
6-1
205

Analysis: Draft-eligible as a sophomore, Susac has raw power and arm strength but has to show he can hit better pitching, which he'll see plenty of this spring in the Pac-10.

19
Danny Hultzen
LHP
6-3
200

Analysis: Famous in draft circles for the wrong reasons -- like his father's tantrum when the Diamondbacks took a flier on him in the 10th round in 2008 -- Hultzen has performed extremely well across two years as a command lefty with good feel but no single plus pitch.

20
Jason Esposito
3B
6-2
205

Analysis: Can hit and hit for power, with a refined approach last year that came from quieting his lower half. Could probably play second if asked but he's above average at third.

21
Daniel Norris
LHP
6-2
180
Science Hill H.S.

Analysis: Not as physical as a Howard or a Bradley or as polished as Bundy, but he'll show above-average velocity with some downhill plane.

22
Josh Bell
OF
6-3
190
Dallas Jesuit H.S.

Analysis: Made a lot of progress on his swing while recovering from a minor knee injury last summer, using his lower half better; he has a very advanced approach and above-average raw power but is probably limited to a corner outfield spot or first base.

23
Alex Meyer
RHP
6-9
220

Analysis: Hit 100 in a recent scrimmage with good sink on the fastball and a wipeout slider, but bad results and perceived lack of toughness prevent his top-of-the-draft stuff from putting him at the top of the draft.

24
Henry Owens
LHP
6-5
180
Edison H.S.

Analysis: Solid-average fastball, above-average changeup, good feel, great deception, good body, not the cleanest arm action.

25
Trevor Bauer
RHP
6-2
185

Analysis: Results are outstanding in a tough conference, but high workloads and unusual training style dominate conversations about him.

26
Levi Michael
SS
5-10
180

Analysis: Switch-hitting shortstop who would be above average if he's forced to return to second but should be able to stay at short.

27
Tyler Beede
RHP
6-4
200
Lawrence Academy

Analysis: Will flash above-average velocity but it's the command, the feel, the off-speed stuff, even the two-seamer, that gets you excited here.

28
Austin Hedges
C
6-1
185
Junipero Serra H.S.

Analysis: Best catch-and-throw prep catcher in the country with some questions on his bat and a lot of rumors about his unsignability.

29
Alex Dickerson
LF
6-3
225

Analysis: Dickerson can hit and shows big raw power in BP, but will be limited defensively to left field or first base; his bat right now looks good enough to profile at either spot.

30
Travis Harrison
3B
6-2
215
Tustin H.S.

Analysis: Perhaps SoCal's best pure bat among preps, Harrison can hit and should hit for power, but he's somewhat slow-twitch and could be ticketed for first base.

31
Ryan Carpenter
LHP
6-5
225

Analysis: Huge left-hander with stuff more average than you'd think from his size. Should benefit from a tough schedule that has him matching up with a number of other major college arms.

32
Michael Kelly
RHP
6-3
185
West Boca Raton H.S.

Analysis: University of Florida commit with a tall, projectable frame, up to 93 comfortably now but with more in there; needs to make better use of his height to stay on top of the ball.

33
Jason Coats
OF
6-2
190

Analysis: Hard-hitting corner outfielder with strong hands and average power projecting better, but very questionable pitch recognition may keep him out of the first round.

34
Scott McGough
RHP
6-1
185

Analysis: Solid-average fastball with above-average changeup and good feel, but doesn't have a big frame for durability.

35
Anthony Meo
RHP
6-2
185

Analysis: Will show mid-90s but area scouts largely peg him as a future reliever based on results and minor arm woes last summer.

36
Shawon Dunston Jr.
OF
6-2
162
Valley Christian H.S.

Analysis: Center fielder who's a plus runner, has good bat speed, uses his hips well and showed a good approach last summer.

37
Tyler Anderson
LHP
6-4
215

Analysis: Las Vegas native is up to 93 with a hard slurve that he'll use against both left- and right-handed hitters.

38
Mikie Mahtook
OF
6-1
192

Analysis: Belongs here if you believe he can stay in center field; if not, he's a third-rounder or worse, as the bat doesn't profile in a corner.

39
Jose Fernandez
RHP
6-4
215
Alonso H.S.

Analysis: Up to 98 already this spring with much better shape to his breaking ball.

40
Philip Evans
SS
5-10
180
La Costa Canyon H.S.

Analysis: "Ballplayer" type who lacks a standout tool but has good feel for the bat and for the middle infield.

41
Joe Ross
RHP
6-2
170
Bishop O'Dowd H.S.

Analysis: Tyson's little brother has a much cleaner delivery and easier arm action with low-90s stuff and a chance for more.

42
Robert Stephenson
RHP
6-2
185
Alhambra H.S.

Analysis: Good frame and two average or better pitches with some violence in the delivery.

43
Brandon Nimmo
OF
6-2
185
Cheyenne East H.S.

Analysis: Athletic outfielder whose high school lacks a baseball team and will spend the spring with his Legion club instead.

44
Blake Forslund
RHP
6-3
210

Analysis: Formerly of UVa, Forslund is one of a handful of pop-up college arms (Kent State redshirt sophomore LHP Andrew Chafin is another) who showed good velocity in fall ball and put themselves on the preseason map.

45
Tyler Goeddel
OF
6-4
175
St. Francis H.S.

Analysis: Younger brother of Mets farmhand Erik -- and son of biotech pioneer David Goeddel -- Tyler's main drawback now is lack of strength, with a frame he should grow into over the next few years.

46
Charles Tilson
OF
6-0
175
New Trier H.S.

Analysis: Star of last year's Area Code Games, Tilson can run and hit with some pop but won't face much quality pitching this spring.

47
Scott Lyman
RHP
6-4
215

Analysis: Brother of Atlanta farmhand Jeff Lyman, Scott will sit 93-95 with a hammer curveball and some feel for a changeup.

48
Taylor Guerrieri
RHP
6-3
180
Spring Valley H.S.

Analysis: Up to 96 in the fall and in early workouts, he's committed to South Carolina and faces some questions about his delivery.

49
Logan Verrett
RHP
6-3
185

Analysis: Up-and-down summer on the Cape dimmed his stock but he'll show good velocity and both a curve and slider as a starter.

50
Cory Spangenberg
SS
6-0
184
Indian River College

Analysis: Former VMI Keydet is committed to Miami for 2011-12 but seems unlikely to get there, as his bat outweighs questions over his position.

PSN - Bigbobbs87
Team Free Travis Snider.
  

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venom lyrix

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Posts: 11,820

#78 [url]

Feb 17 11 10:17 PM

Th3RealF0lkBlu3s wrote:
venom lyrix wrote:
Th3RealF0lkBlu3s wrote:
A's in 2018.

*Fixed


Nope, pitching is among the top of the league this year. Just have to get into October.
Stop looking at your roster with blinders on. You guys have 1 legit starter, Cahill, THAT'S IT. Everyone else was either hurt in 2010 or is not proven to be given the label  of top-tier pitching. The A's offense is nothing special and is not better than the Angels or the Rangers. Thus the lack of runs won't compensate for the "stellar" pitching you think you have. Don't give the roster more credit than they deserve, because you are an A's fan, it only leads to disappointment.

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WearinTheFourFive

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Posts: 3,438

#79 [url]

Feb 17 11 10:43 PM

venom lyrix wrote:
Th3RealF0lkBlu3s wrote:
venom lyrix wrote:
Th3RealF0lkBlu3s wrote:
A's in 2018.

*Fixed


Nope, pitching is among the top of the league this year. Just have to get into October.
Stop looking at your roster with blinders on. You guys have 1 legit starter, Cahill, THAT'S IT. Everyone else was either hurt in 2010 or is not proven to be given the label  of top-tier pitching. The A's offense is nothing special and is not better than the Angels or the Rangers. Thus the lack of runs won't compensate for the "stellar" pitching you think you have. Don't give the roster more credit than they deserve, because you are an A's fan, it only leads to disappointment.

1 legit starter? Man, I know we're not great, but how can our pitching NOT be stellar when we went .500 last year without having a lick of offense? Then we upgraded 3 starting positions and you say our team isn't likely to contend this year? Give some credit where it is due, man.

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